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2 edition of Bioassay of phenol for possible carcinogenicity found in the catalog.

Bioassay of phenol for possible carcinogenicity

National Cancer Institute (U.S.).

Bioassay of phenol for possible carcinogenicity

by National Cancer Institute (U.S.).

  • 243 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Carcinogenicity testing.,
  • Phenol -- Toxicology.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementCarcinogenesis Testing Program, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, and National Toxicology Program.
    SeriesCarcinogenesis technical report series ; no. 203, DHHS publication ; no. (NIH) 80-1759, NTP ; 80-15, DHHS publication -- no. (NIH) 80-1759., NTP (Series) -- 80-15.
    ContributionsNational Institutes of Health (U.S.).
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 123 p. :
    Number of Pages123
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15241388M

    As in the case of the mouse bioassay, interpreting these bioassay results for estimating low-dose human cancer is highly problematic. 4. Challenges interpreting and utilizing the NTP bioassays. In the past four decades many hundreds of chemical agents have been tested for carcinogenicity through standardized bioassays (NRC, ; p. 17). A Cited by:   Phenol is a manufactured substance found in a number of consumer products. Skin exposure to high levels of phenol has resulted in liver damage, diarrhea, dark urine, and hemolytic anemia. Phenol has been found in at least of the 1, National Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

    Phenol is an aromatic, organic compound. It's structure is formed from six carbon atoms, six hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom. It has a sweet odour and is a colourless, crystalline solid. Making the formula: C6H6O or C6H5OH. Simply, it can be.   Abstract. “All models are wrong, some models are useful”George E.P. Box, “Robustness in the strategy of scientific model building”, This quote from GeorgCited by:

    Bisphenol A Carcinogenicity Assessment Research Bisphenol A is not a carcinogen, that is it does not cause or induce cancer in laboratory animals. One of the most thorough studies in this area was performed by the U.S. National Toxicology Program. The earliest reference noted for the estrogenic action of BPA was a report of a bioassay for a positive estrus response, as measured by cornification in vaginal smears, that occurred in ovariectomized rats dosed (route unspecified) twice daily with mg BPA dissolved or suspended in sesame oil on three successive days (Dodds and Lawson, ).


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Bioassay of phenol for possible carcinogenicity by National Cancer Institute (U.S.). Download PDF EPUB FB2

Bioassay of phenol for possible carcinogenicity. [Bethesda, Md.]: U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, (OCoLC) Phenol has bee n ranke 38td ihn production amon U.

Sg chemical. s with production of billion pounds in A bioassay of phenol to test for possible carcinogenicit wa conductes y by providin d g this i substancn e drinking water t o F rats and B6C3F1 mice. Group of 50s rats and 50 miceFile Size: 4MB.

Bioassay of 4-aminonitrophenol for possible carcinogenicity (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: National Cancer Institute (U.S.).

Division of Cancer Cause and Prevention. OCLC Number: Notes: "CAS no. " Description. A bioassay of phenol to test for possible carcinogenicity was conducted by providing this substance in drinking water to F rats and B6C3F1 mice.

Groups of 50 rats and 50 mice of each sex were given drinking water containing 2, or 5, ppm phenol for weeks. As matched controls, groups of 50 rats and 50 mice of each sex received tap water.

A bioassay of p-cresidine for possible carcinogenicity was con­ ducted using Fischer rats and B6C3F1 mice. p-Cresidine was ad­ ministered in the feed, at either of two concentrations, to groups of 50 male and 50 female animals of each species.

The dietary con­ centrations used in File Size: 3MB. A bioassay of technical-grade hydrazobenzene for possible carcinogenicity was conducted using Fischer rats and B6C3F1 mice.

Hydrazobenzene was administered in the feed, at either of two concentrations, to groups of 50 male and 47 to 50 females animals of each species. The committee began meeting in January and selected as its first topic of study and use of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in animal bioassays, with emphasis on the relationship between the MTD and the carcinogenic potency of a test chemical.

A bioassay of hexachlorophene for possible carcinogenicity was conducted by administering the test chemical in feed to Fischer rats. Groups of 24 rats of each sex were administered hexachlorophene at one of three doses, eit 50, or ppm, for weeks. Higher doses of ppm, used in 8-week subchronic.

PHENOL 8. REGULATIONS AND ADVISORIES. The IARC classification for phenol is Group 3, not classifiable with regard to its carcinogenicity to humans (IARC ). The EPA cancer classification for phenol is D, not classifiable as to human carcinogenicity (IRIS ).

The National Toxicology Program has not classified phenol for humanFile Size: KB. Phenol is a colorless or white solid when it is pure; however, it is usually sold and used as a liquid. (1) The odor threshold for phenol is parts per million (ppm), with a strong very sweet odor reported.

(1,7) Phenol is very soluble in water and is quite flammable. (2) The chemical formula for phenol is C 6 H 6. I am answering this question based on my practical work directly with phenol, both in the lab and at industrial reactor scale.

Phenol is in solid state at room temperature with light pink color that melts at around 41 °C. In solid it is in the f. Carcinogenicity Bioassay of Bisphenol A. An Evaluation of the Possible Carcinogenicity of Bisphenol A to Humans.

Article. This book contains over 30 selections. Phenol is also used in the production of synthetic fibers such as nylon and for epoxy resin precursors such as bisphenol-A. Phenol is toxic to bacteria and fungi, and it is used as a slimicide and disinfectant.

Because of its anesthetic effects, phenol is used in medicines such as ointments, ear and nose drops, cold sore lotions, throat lozenges. Animal Carcinogenicity Studies: 3. Alternatives to the Bioassay. carcinogenicity bioassay in the general literature and the potential for the possible incorporation of alternative tests.

Phenol is an organic compound appreciably soluble in water, with about g dissolving in mL ( M). Homogeneous mixtures of phenol and water at phenol to water mass ratios of ~ and higher are possible. The sodium salt of phenol, sodium phenoxide, is far more water-soluble.

Acidity. Phenol is a Appearance: Transparent crystalline solid. BREAST CANCER & THE ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH CENTERS compounds related to the organic chemical compound phenol naturally present in most foods.

Phenol is used as a slimicide, a disinfectant, in medical products, and as a reagent in research for phenols is Group 3, not classifiable with regard to its carcinogenicity to humans (1,2,3). Bioassay of phenol for possible carcinogenicity [] National Cancer Institute (U.S.).

Bethesda, Md.: Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), also known as dibutylhydroxytoluene, is a lipophilic organic compound, chemically a derivative of phenol, that is useful for its antioxidant properties.

[better source needed] BHT is widely used to prevent free radical-mediated oxidation in fluids (e.g. fuels, oils) and other materials, and the regulations overseen by the U.S.

F.D.A.—which considers BHT to be E number: E (antioxidants, ). aniline-induced carcinogenicity in mice of either sex (National Cancer Institute, ~. This carcinogenesis bioassay was conducted according to the usual National Cancer Institute (NCI) protocol, which utilizes an MTD and one-half MOD as the doses for the study.

Mutagenicity The data from mutagenicity tests of aniline are summarized in Table A reason for concern is some evidence that phenol may be genotoxic and the fact that there is insufficient data to discount with certainty the possible carcinogenicity of the compound.

The evaluation must be kept under periodic review. Environment Phenol is not expected to bioaccumulate significantly. REGULATORY TOXICOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 3, () The Power and Interpretation of the Carcinogenicity Bioassay D.

B. CLAYSON,I D. KREWSKI, AND 1. C. MUNRO Health Protection Branch, Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Canada Received Carcinogenicity is a major consideration in the assessment of risks due to environmental Cited by: A bioassay of technical grade 1-nitronaphthalene for possible carcinogenicity was conducted using Fischer rats and B6C3F1 mice.

/The cmpd/ was administered in the feed, at either of two concentrations, to groups of 50 male and 50 female animals of each species.Increasing information lends further credence that metabolites of benzene are primarily responsible for its carcinogenic activity.

2,– Phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol are the major metabolites of benzene in mammals, established in analyses of human urine, and have been tested for long-term carcinogenicity. Phenol, to a.